20 Years Ago

20 years ago, in the lobby of Walker Hall at Graceland, right before our first Thanksgiving together, we became “official.” A little over a year later, we were engaged. About a year and a half after that, we got married.

17 years of marriage, one apartment, one house, three dogs, three cars, eight countries, countless @shaneandalli photo shoots, and about a half-dozen jobs later, we are still adventuring together and it’s as fun as it ever has been.

Here’s to the next twenty…
and the twenty after that…
and the twenty after that…
and hopefully the twenty after that.
Love you. I’m so thankful for you.

A post shared by Shane Adams (@shaneadams) on

Happy Birthday, Alli

You entered the world 40 years ago and my life permanently almost 20 years ago. Everyday, I am enamored by your beauty, uplifted by your smile, buoyed by your laughter, enthralled by your conversation, connected by your friendship, and fulfilled by your love. Your existence on this planet makes mine worthwhile.

I love you. More than anything. More than everything.

Even more than the pecan torte we had tonight.

A post shared by Shane Adams (@shaneadams) on

Above All, Do What You Love

A few weeks ago, I announced that I was leaving AMC. That was a hard decision and not one that I came to lightly. But I felt good about it because I was leaving on my own terms to do something that I loved and start/continue a photography business with my wife at Shane & Alli Photography.

There’s a tiny wrinkle.

I don’t know about you, but I’ve always kept a very short list in my head of the companies that I really dreamed about working for; you know, the ones that you think the world of, the ones that you truly advocate for and that you envision working at for your career. My list is very short and anyone who knows me well knows that there is probably one company above all the others on my list:


Steve Ells’ Denver-based company is one that I’ve thought extremely fondly of for many years. When I first set foot in the Corporate Woods location off of College Boulevard in Overland Park, I could tell it was a special place. Ever since then, my love for the company has only grown, both as a fan and professionally.

When I joined AMC in 2010, I managed to connect with some of the members of Chipotle’s social team. (OK, I may have stalked them sought them out.) At my first SXSW conference, I got to meet two guys in particular who have become close friends over the past few years — Joe and Rusty. If you have ever tweeted at @ChipotleTweets, I’m sure those names sound familiar.

We’ve stayed in touch over the past several years and we actually got to spend some time together when they were in town for the Chipotle Cultivate Festival here in Kansas City. In fact, I even moderated a panel with them, joined by Myra and Candice, for the Social Media Club of Kansas City. It was a pretty great moment for me. These were people that I have been able to develop friendships with over the years through social and I got to sit with them as they shared their expertise with a room full of social media and marketing professionals.

As I heard them talk, I got more and more inspired by the work that they do and the company that they work for. Chipotle’s approach to not only their food, but their people, is something that I was blown away by. The fact that they put on three free Cultivate Festivals every single year in order to better educate their customers about why they do things — that was a pretty neat realization.

Another thing I found out was that their team had an open position.

A position that I will start in September as a Community Engagement Strategist for Chipotle Mexican Grill.


In order to cut off a few questions at the pass, I have created this handy-dandy little FAQ section:

So what are you going to be doing?
My main job will be responding day-to-day to loyal Chipotle customers (just like me) on Chipotle’s various social channels, mostly Facebook and Twitter. I’ll get to interact with Chipotle fans and people who have good and bad experiences (though those are pretty rare, I assume), and be one of the voices of customer care for the company. I had gotten pretty far away from this at AMC and I’m really excited to get in the trenches again.

But Chipotle is in Denver! Are you moving?
I am not moving. It’s true that Chipotle is based in Denver, but I will be working from the comfy IKEA chair in my office. One of the great things about the digital age is that I can do that and still feel connected to the team. Sure I’ll have to travel to Denver (where my boss, the aforementioned Joe, is based) and NYC (where the digital director is based), but the majority of my work will be done behind one of those fancy computer thingies.

Can I have a free burrito?
I haven’t even started yet and you already have your hand out? Jeez.

And the most important question:

So what does this mean for Shane & Alli Photography?

The answer is: very little changes. One of the great benefits that I listed above is that I’ll be working out of the home. That will still allow me enough flexibility to continue to grow our photography business. We plan to still open an in-home studio and we plan to continue taking photography jobs fast and furiously. (Seriously, if you’re looking for a photographer, give us a shout.)

Photography will always be our love. I love working with my wife and best friend. I love capturing the special moments of life for our clients, our families and our friends. Those images are special and important and I love that work.

This tiny wrinkle allows us a bit more breathing room to continue to grow our business in a more measured way. And it also gives me the opportunity to work for a company I love, doing something that I’m good at, working alongside people that I really like a lot. I wouldn’t be able to do this if not for the amazing support I get from Alli and our families. Our business is going to continue to grow and this gives us a bit of leeway to do a little bit more with it than before.

I’ve always thought of myself as a bit of a renaissance man. I’m interested in a myriad of things. And I never said that anyone should limit themselves to just one passion in their life. I love a lot of things and some more than others. Obviously, I love my wife above all. I love our dogs, Buzz and Woody. I love photography and capturing the moments that life brings alongside my best friend and partner. I love music and movies and food and especially burritos. In this new world, I get to spend time on all the things I love.

After all, isn’t that how we should spend our lives?

Saying Goodbye to AMC

To start, I should probably take you back about 20 years.

I think I was about 18 years old when I figured out that AMC was based in Kansas City. As a teenager, I couldn’t think of a job that sounded like more fun. Working for a movie theater chain? Sign me up.

It took me about ten years of my career, but in 2010, I finally made it to the company I’d set my sights on so long ago. At the end of this month, I will say goodbye to that company to embark on a brand new adventure. More on that in a bit…

A little reflection

The past five-plus years have been so much fun. I got to work on something I love (movies) for a company I respect (AMC) with a lot of really talented people (too many to list). I got to do fun things like help launch the company’s Twitter presence (which got some national recognition), redesign and rearchitect the company’s website and then got to take on a completely new challenge, leading the loyalty program for the past 2+ years. I got promoted. I got to manage people. I got to help craft the marketing strategy for one of the most respected brands in entertainment.

There are so many things that I’ve loved about my job. Sure, there have been things that have been difficult about it, but that comes with any position. I consider myself really really lucky to have been able to work at AMC for as long as I have.

But it’s time to move on.

Some of you might know that my wife and I have been running a photography business in Kansas City for the past several years. Starting August 1, we will officially be running Shane & Alli Photography as our primary business and sole source of income.

For the past 15 years, I’ve been working hard in corporate America. I’ve seen a lot of success bringing my skills and ideas to other people. Alli and I have had this business on the side that we’ve absolutely adored and wanted to do full time for a while. We’ve decided to take the leap and we can’t wait for what’s next.

Photography? But you’re in marketing.

Photography has been a passion of mine since I first picked up a camera as a kid. I remember a time in my life when I saw myself as an Associated Press photographer. What I’ve learned is that capturing people in real-life moments is so rewarding and affords me such great creativity that I don’t need to travel the world to tell stories with photos. We’ve got plenty right here in our backyard.

Not only that, but I’m planning to take my 15 years of corporate consumer and business marketing experience and applying it to creating new photography offerings that solve needs for businesses in their social media marketing practices.

Most importantly, I get to run a business with my best friend. Alli and I have really enjoyed every moment that we’ve been able to work together on this business. And who knows? Maybe we’ll turn it into even more cool things down the road. For now, we’re going to build out our studio and focus on capturing snapshots of the special moments in our clients’ lives. We think we are pretty good at it.

So here’s my pitch…

What’s that you say?

You need family photos or senior photos or professional portraits or engagement or wedding photos? We do it all. Our website is getting a refresh. You can find us on Facebook or on follow us on Instagram, Twitter or Tumblr. Or you can just shoot me an email. We’d be happy to help.

Getting to Green

Last Friday, my good friend Gene invited me to speak on a panel at the Social Media Club of Kansas City to talk about wearable technology and how it has affected my life, specifically, my fitness.

Shane Adams at SMCKC Breakfast

Before you laugh (which is what I did at first), the truth is that I’m actually a pretty good candidate to talk about a topic like this rather than some tech blogger or gadget blogger or fitness guru. I’m exactly who wearable fitness technology should be designed for: I’m somewhat overweight, a little nerdy and in need of some motivation.

My FuelBand

Two birthdays ago, I asked Alli to get me a Nike+ FuelBand. There are lots of wearable fitness bands out there, but I’m a Nike loyalist so this seemed like a good choice. I liked that there was an app (iTunes) to monitor my progress on my iPhone and the design was pretty straightforward and cool. So in December, I began tracking my progress of how much activity I managed each day.

I set my goal at 2500 “Fuel Points” each day. “Fuel” is Nike’s proprietary way of tracking movement. While other fitness gadgets typically track steps (which the FuelBand does too), I liked the idea of tracking my overall activity. I didn’t have to know the science behind it, it just had to work.

So I started moving more.

At first, I would just move around the house. It was winter in Kansas when I got my FuelBand, so outdoor activities were out. I would get on our elliptical machine at home, or do a workout video…anything to get out of the sedentary rut that I was in. Over time, I became obsessed with watching my FuelBand get progressively more full and I would always feel a sense of accomplishment each day that I “got to green” (reached my daily Fuel goal).

Trying to “Be a Runner”

On a whim, I decided I would try running as one of my ways to get to green. I downloaded the Nike+ Running app (iTunes) because I wanted to see how far I could run and I just started running.

I quickly discovered that running is the worst.

BUT…I looked at my FuelBand after my run and I was already to green. I had run for about 15, maybe 20 minutes tops and I had reached my Fuel goal. This was a revelation to me. I could work out for a very short period of time and get to my daily fitness goal, which is all I really cared about at the time. If I could get to green faster by suffering through a couple of miles a few times per week, I guess I could try it.

So I started running a couple of times per week. I bought some new running shoes (Nikes, of course) and I even upped my daily goal from 2500 to 3000, feeling like I needed to push myself a little more. I entered into last summer and went on a streak of over two months in a row where I reached my Fuel. I was feeling good, so when Gene said to me, “Hey man, I see you’ve been running lately. Do you want to run a 5K together?” I agreed. It would give me something to aim at, even though I wasn’t running more than 2.5 miles at a time. (Adding another half-mile or so couldn’t be that hard, could it?)

“Training” for My First 5K

We put a race last fall on the calendar that was (thankfully) rained out. It was a busy time of year. I got out of the habit of running quite as regularly as I’d hoped. And then winter came again. There would be no 5K in 2013.

Fortunately, Kansas City has a bunch of 5Ks, including one that Gene was the race director for a few years ago. So we signed up for that one.

It was last Saturday.

It was cold and I still don’t feel like I am a runner, but I finished my first 5K, 16 months after I got my first Nike+ FuelBand (I say first, because I had to buy a new one last week when my old one stopped charging). Over that same period, I’ve lost about 20 pounds (I still have plenty more to lose) and I feel better about my health than I have at any time in my thirties.

What’s Next

The January before I got my first FuelBand, I hurt my back so badly that I couldn’t walk for a few days. I had herniated four discs in my lower spine. I went through rehab. I went to the chiropractor. Both told me I had to be stronger in my core. Now, running isn’t exactly good for your back, but it worked for me.

Fast-forward two years later: after I crossed the finish line on Saturday, I looked at my Nike+ Running app. I had run my first 5K at a pace that was almost 3 minutes faster than my original goal (don’t freak out, it was still really slow). I didn’t die. In fact, I thought to myself, “I could probably have run faster.” Which, if you know me at all, you’ll realize that these words coming out of my mouth is as unlikely as me buying season tickets to the Royals.

So I guess I have to find another race, keep training and keep improving. My friend Jake once told me not to focus on pace, but just worry about doing the miles. So I’ll keep running. Then maybe this fall, I’ll try a 10K. Making the jump to a half-marathon…don’t count on it.

And I’ll be tracking it all along the way.